FORMAT YOUR HARD DRIVE

 
 
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HOW TO FORMAT YOUR HARD DRIVE

 
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STEP 1: PLUG IN YOUR DIGITAL MEDIA STORAGE DEVICE

When formatting your digital media storage device, make sure that the drive is empty or that you have your files backed up on a different source.  When a drive is formatted, all data is completely wiped from the disk.  This process also prepares your hard drive for the type of computer operating system you will be using it on.

SHOPPING FOR DIGITAL MEDIA STORAGE DEVICE

Whether you purchase or rent your Media Storage Device, make sure it is USB 3.0 compatible.  This will help with the transfer speed of your files.  For video, I recommend that all students purchase a portable hard drive with at least 1 TB of storage space (average price $55).  Flash Drives can also work when transporting smaller amounts of files.  Make sure to also get a case or lanyard for your device so that it stays projected.  I also suggest labeling your case and device with your first and last name and email and/or phone number.

 

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STEP 2: OPEN DISK UTILITY (MAC)

Select the disc or volume in the sidebar.  It is very important that you select the correct drive so that you do not erase something that you do not want to erase.  Your device should appear in the External category. To avoid any mistakes, format your devices one at a time, or remove any unnecessary drives from USB ports.  

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STEP 3: CLICK THE ERASE ICON TO BEGIN FORMATTING PROCESS

In this window you can change the name of your drive. Personalize your drive to avoid mixing up devices when you have multiple projects or classes.

STEP 4: CLICK ON THE FORMAT POP UP MENU AND MAKE A SELECTION

Pick a volume format based on the computers and size of the device you purchased.

Mac OS Extended (Journaled)

Uses the Mac format (Journaled HFS Plus) to protect the integrity of the hierarchical file system.

Mac OS Extended (Journaled, Encrypted)

Uses the Mac format, requires a password, and encrypts the partition.

Mac OS Extended (Case-sensitive, Journaled)

Uses the Mac format and is case sensitive to folder names. For example, folders named “Homework” and “HOMEWORK” are two different folders.

Mac OS Extended (Case-sensitive, Journaled, Encrypted)

Uses the Mac format, is case sensitive to folder names, requires a password, and encrypts the partition.

MS-DOS (FAT)

Use for Windows volumes that are 32 GB or less.

ExFAT

Use for Windows volumes that are over 32 GB.

STEP 5: CLICK ERASE TO CONFIRM FORMATTING

After you click on the Erase button, your drive will disappear from the desktop and reappear with your new drive Name.  When the process is complete, another window will pop up telling you the process is done.

STEP 6: YOU ARE DONE!

When the formatting process is done, you will see this message window pop up.  Click the DONE button and Quit the Disk Utility program.  You will see your hard drive on the Desktop labeled with your new disk Name.  When you open the folder the contents should be empty.  Make sure test your hard drive on both systems if you formatted your drive with MS-DOS.